Why You Need Plants in Your Life

Not only do indoor plants enhance the overall appearance of a space, but they've been shown to boost moods, increase creativity, reduce stress, and eliminate air pollutants — making for a healthier, happier you.

Why You Need Plants in Your Life

Words by The Sill

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Not only do indoor plants enhance the overall appearance of a space, but they've been shown to boost moods, increase creativity, reduce stress, and eliminate air pollutants — making for a healthier, happier you.

Indoor plants don’t just look good – they can make us feel good, too. Studies have shown indoor plants... 

  • Boost your mood, productivity, concentration and creativity
  • Reduce your stress, fatigue, sore throats and colds
  • Help clean indoor air by absorbing toxins, increasing humidity & producing oxygen
  • Add life to a sterile space, give privacy and reduce noise levels
  • Are therapeutic to care for (it’s true when we say Plants Make People Happy) 
Back to Nature

When you feel a little low, it’s amazing what a walk in the park can do. That’s because when we get in touch with nature, we reduce mental fatigue and stress, while increasing relaxation and self-esteem. Studies have shown even brief exposure to nature can make us more altruistic and cooperative, and that touching real foliage can elicit an unconscious calming effect. Some studies have shown that in offices where indoor plants are present, work performance increases, staff well-being improves and employees take less sick days (than offices without plants).

And whether your plant passion is a solo endeavor or you find yourself building bonds with fellow plant lovers – that feel-good feeling plants give you won’t go unnoticed. Especially as we spend more time indoors, we are reminded how calming it is to care for our plants, and what their growth can tell us about our own. 

Not to mention plants are easy on the eyes. A key design element in any room, nothing contributes warmth and style to a space the way plants do. They provide the perfect architectural element and anchor a space in an organic way. And no matter your personal design aesthetic, a dose of green is a universally chic color choice. There are no set rules when it comes to decorating with plants, only a thousand possibilities.

Plants Against Pollution

Pollution levels on the planet earth are on the rise. If you live in a busy, dense city, you encounter pollution everyday. It wreaks havoc on our skin, our hair and most of all, the air we breathe. Pollution is not just outside. It can be in the places we call work and home, too. Sick Building Syndrome is a term used to describe symptoms experienced by otherwise healthy people working in large commercial buildings – think sudden allergies; irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat; headache, dizziness, and fatigue; respiratory and sinus congestion; and nervous system disorders. In 1989, Dr. Bill Wolverton, a leading scientist in NASA’s Clean Air Study revealed, “when the building occupants are away for a given time, the symptoms usually diminish, only to recur upon re-entry into the building.”

The cause? Indoor air pollution, generally a consequence of toxic emissions from synthetic building materials, airborne mold, viruses, and pollutants, along with energy efficient construction, like making spaces as airtight as possible, which reduces the air circulation. These contributors release toxin emissions such as benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, xylene and toluene. Gross, right?

It’s not just big commercial buildings either. These compounds can be found in almost every home. Not great news when the Environmental Protection Agency estimates Americans spend approximately 90 percent of their time indoors.

Most wall paints, rubbers, vinyl, laminates, computer parts and plastics all break down over time and release compounds into the air we breathe. The good news is, we can improve our indoor air quality with plants. Plants absorb harmful toxins, breaking them down into gentle byproducts, and storing them in their soil to use later for food.

We are only beginning to understand the impact indoor air quality has on our mental health and work performance, but so far, the introduction of indoor plants to improve indoor air and reduce pollution points to positive outcomes.


Meet some of our favorite air-purifying plants:

Snake Plant

This no-fuss tropical plant has thin, upright leaves with irregular banding that resembles the skin of a reptile. Its adaptations for surviving drought make it a suitable plant choice for anyone, anywhere. Snake Plants have been shown to filter benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, xylene and toluene.

Pothos

Nicknamed the “cubicle plant” at our office, the Pothos is our go-to for customers with less than ideal conditions. Like the similar-looking Philodendron, this plant's trailing vines can grow to over 10 feet long. The Pothos has been shown to filter benzene, formaldehyde, xylene and toluene.

ZZ plant

A ZZ Plant is a spectacular choice for any low-light environment. They are extremely dry-tolerant and low maintenance. In addition, the plant meaning of ZZ is prosperity and friendship, making it a great gift for the plant lover (or future plant parent) in your life.

Bird’s Nest Fern

The Bird’s Nest Fern is characterized by ripple-edged fronds that grow out of a nest-like crown. It makes for a lovely hanging plant indoor. They thrive in indirect light and a humid environment. Ferns have been shown to filter formaldehyde, xylene and toluene.

Philodendron

In the right indoor conditions, the Philodendron’s heart-shaped leaves and trailing vines can trail to over 10 feet long, making it the perfect plant for a high shelf. Did we mention it has a reputation of being one of the easiest houseplants to grow? Philodendrons have been shown to filter formaldehyde.

Authors Note: For more information, check out NASA’s Clean Air Study and Dr. B.C. “Bill” Wolverton’s “How to Grow Fresh Air: 50 Houseplants That Purify Your Home or Office”. 

Ready to get started on your plant journey? Join us on Saturday, 11/7 for our brand new Intro to Plant Parenting Online Workshop, a virtual masterclass about the foundations of plant care, taught by our very own plant experts.

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