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Hen and Chick and Calvert

Color:

Matte White
Matte Black
Sonora
Blush
Yellow
Blue

THE SILL SHOP WORKSHOP: NO GREEN THUMB REQUIRED

THE SILL PLANT PROMISE:

YOUR PLANT OR GIFT IS GUARANTEED FOR 30 DAYS, NO QUESTIONS ASKED.

Check out this cute plant

Hen and Chicks -
Sempervivum spp.

Sempervivum is a genus of succulents in the stonecrop family, Crassulaceae with an uncommon native range. It is one of the few succulents native to Europe and temperate Asia. These plants are called stonecrops, because they are often seen growing in between cracks on rock faces and boulders. Sempervivum is also known as ‘Hen and Chicks’, which is a name that generally refers to clumping succulents.

In ancient times, it was observed that thunderbolts would never strike these plants, so they were thought to ward off thunderbolts, sorcery, and storm damage, and therefore planted on roofs of houses. We now know that it’s likely that the boulders that this plant grows on are the real reason why these plants were rarely struck by lightning. This plant was associated with the gods of thunder - Jupiter, Thor, and Perun (depending on your flavor of mythology- Roman, Norse, and Slavic respectively). The plant’s clumping habit is said to resemble their beards.

Many cultivars exist in production today, and of the Sempervivum, this one is the hardest to kill plant.

PLANT ORIGINS

Mountainous Europe and Western Asia

Plant Care

Light

Bright, direct sun to bright indirect light.

Water

Water weekly to semi-monthly. Allow potting mix to completely dry out before watering. The smaller the pot, the faster the soil dries out. If it's in direct sun, it will need more frequent waterings, as the sun will dry it out faster. Water more frequently during warmer months and fertilize during growth. Do not overwater or keep the soil wet for too long, as this will encourage root rot Remember, these are desert plants- they can go for a while without a drink.

Extra Love

The easiest way to kill a succulent is to overwater it or leave it wet for too long! Love this one more by tending to it less. #independentplant